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Armed with smartphones, tablets and laptops, meeting attendees are more connected than ever, but often have a hard time unplugging and focusing on the event they are attending. To draw attendees back to the present, Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa in San Antonio helps planners orchestrate meetings that make mindfulness a priority.

At the resort, Windflower—The Hill Country Spa offers group yoga, meditation and opportunities to unwind at a private pool or large covered back porch overlooking 300 acres of Texas Hill Country.

“Mindfulness and its impact on meetings is something that’s just beginning to take hold in the meetings and events industry, but it’s a focus worth exploring,” says Jeff Donahoe, director of sales and marketing at Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort and Spa. “Health and wellness is more than just a meeting trend and mindfulness is part of that. Creating an environment where attendees can focus and engage makes meetings more productive.” 

The Highland Lakes Region extends from Lady Bird Lake in downtown Austin to 100 miles outside the city to Lake Buchanan. The chain of seven lakes formed from a series of dams along the Colorado River offer opportunities to boat, kayak, fish and swim while taking in the Texas Hill Country. 

It’s a “serene environment,” says Salina McCullough, sales and programs manager at Canyon of the Eagles, “away from the hustle and bustle of the city.”

 

Under 5 percent is what Carmen Callo, executive chef at Centerplate, estimates is the percentage of special dietary requests he received about five years ago. Today, as he oversees catering at Colorado Convention Center in Denver, he and his team are cooking for groups where 15 to 20 percent of attendees have special dietary requirements.

 

Organization is key to a planners’ success; a system for staying on track makes for a sense of control, even for the largest of workloads. But keeping track of daily tasks, upcoming events and goals can be overwhelming, and rarely are all those things recorded in one place. That is until the Bullet Journal took hold. Ryder Carroll, inventor of the Bullet Journal, calls it “an analog system for the digital age that will help you track the past, organize the present, and plan for the future."